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Election audit of Jessamine County shows clean report

From staff reports

FRANKFORT — Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear recently announced the postelection audits conducted by his office in six counties revealed no potential criminal activity surrounding the 2018 May primary.

The recently concluded audits of Bullitt, Jessamine, Owen, Powell, Rowan and Scott counties were clean, Beshear said.

After the drawing was held on June 6, the AG’s Department of Criminal Investigations Public Integrity Unit checked election forms and interviewed county officials as part of the audits. The unit investigates numerous arenas of corruption including election fraud.

The unit, which investigates and prosecutes election law violations, then presented the audits to the respective county grand juries.

“Our extensive audits are part of the AG’s legal authority to ensure the integrity of the election process in Kentucky,” Beshear said. “The work leading up to and during the primary election by many, including our investigators and local county election officials, helped to ensure an impartial and fair election process.”

Kentucky law requires Beshear’s office to conduct postelection audits in no fewer than 5 percent of Kentucky’s counties following each primary and general election.

The office answers the Election Law Violations hotline — 800-328-VOTE (8683) — on a daily basis throughout the year, with an expanded presence on primary and general election days. Beshear’s staff reviews complaints and, when appropriate, refers them for further action.

During the 2018 primary election cycle, Beshear’s office reportedly received 339 election complaints through the hotline or other sources. Of that number, 25 complaints are still under review by Beshear’s Department of Criminal Investigations. By law, the office allegedly cannot provide details regarding specific complaints or possible pending investigations.

The Special Prosecutions Unit coordinates election monitoring with the State Board of Elections, Secretary of State’s Office, Kentucky State Police, U.S. Attorney’s Office and the FBI. This monitoring looks at not only primary and general elections, but also special elections held throughout the state.